Home

Annual Fun Run a “Shoe-In” For Local Kids

Leave a comment

By Carol Wilkinson

All photos courtesy of St. David's School of Nursing.

All photos courtesy of St. David’s School of Nursing.

The second annual “Paws for a Cause” 5K Fun Run will be held Saturday, April 27, 2013, at 8 a.m., on the Texas State University Round Rock Campus. The 5K Run, sponsored by the Student Nurse Organization at St. David’s School of Nursing at Texas State University, raises funds to help facilitate the purchase of properly fitting shoes for underserved school age children.

From 2011-2012, as part of a research project, students of St. David’s School of Nursing worked with Georgetown Independent School District elementary school nurses to collect data on playground injuries. The nursing students found a strong correlation between playground injuries and improperly fitting shoes. Last year’s first annual run raised enough to acquire ninety pairs of shoes for Georgetown ISD.

All photos courtesy of St. David's School of Nursing.

All photos courtesy of St. David’s School of Nursing.

This year, the fundraiser will benefit Round Rock ISD’s unaccompanied youth. “According to Round Rock ISD, unaccompanied youth includes young people who have been separated from their parents for a variety of reasons. For many of these young people, leaving home is a survival issue. Unaccompanied youth may lack a variety of resources while attending public school. The nursing students strive to meet these community needs,” noted Angela Franco (junior co-chair) and Jennefer Wiegrefe (senior co-chair) of the 5K race. The committee estimates around 50-100 people will participate in this year’s run. Several local sponsors will donate shoes.

“We wanted to give back to the Round Rock community while promoting the health benefits of exercising. The 5K gives people a chance to get out there and run for a good cause,” Franco said. For Franco, the best thing about the run is “the energy and smiles of all the volunteers and runners working together for a good cause.”

All photos courtesy of St. David's School of Nursing.

All photos courtesy of St. David’s School of Nursing.

All the volunteers on hand during the race will be either junior- or senior-class students, faculty, or staff from St. David’s School of Nursing. An estimated 30 volunteers will help with this event. The Fun Run is open to the public and all registered participants will receive a t-shirt. Registration cost is $25. You may register or donate online by visiting the Paws for a Cause 5k website. For questions about the run, please email pawsforacause@txstate.edu. For more information about Round Rock ISD unaccompanied youth, go to www.roundrockisd.org.

Advertisements

Knowledge is Power

Leave a comment

Dr. Leslie Huling

Leslie Huling, EdD

By Carol Wilkinson and Jael Perales

The world of public education is changing every day. As the demands on high school graduates increase, public educators in the state of Texas are under pressure to prepare their students for a more rigorous college and/or career environment. To ensure state-wide improvement in students’ educations, the Texas Education Agency (TEA) has developed a new standardized exam which has once again raised the bar for students and educators alike. In an effort to update local communities on this rapidly evolving situation, Texas State Round Rock Campus will be hosting a Public Education Forum entitled, “College and Career Readiness and STARR: An Update for Educators, Parents and Community Member.” The forum will be held on Thursday, January 31, 2013, starting at 5:45pm in Avery 252. Scheduled to speak at this event are Leslie Huling, EdD, and David D. Molina, PhD.

Dr. Leslie Huling is a professor in the College of Education’s Curriculum and Instruction Department at Texas State University and the director of the Educations Policy Implementation Center (EPIC) here at the Round Rock Campus. She is the principal investigator on several grants related to college and career readiness, including the grants that support the operation of the CCRI Mathematics Faculty Collaborative and Success Initiative in Developmental Education – Mathematics (SIDE-M) project. Under Dr. Huling’s direction, EPIC has generated more than $25 million in educational grant funding for Texas State, contributing to the university’s success in being named one of eight Emerging Research Institutions in the state of Texas.

For the Public Education Forum, Dr. Huling will discuss “Texas College and Career Readiness Initiative and Texas State’s Leadership in Faculty Development for the State.” The Texas College and Career Readiness Standards was enacted by the 79th Texas Legislature and seeks to increase the number of students who are college and career ready when they graduate high school.

Dr. David D. Molina serves as president of David Molina & Associates, Inc., an educational consulting and professional development provider. A former high school teacher, Dr. Molina served as a program director at the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas at Austin and on the faculties at UT and Trinity University.  His work includes contributions to public education policy, curriculum development, and teacher preparation reform. Today, Dr. Molina works with schools and districts on teacher and leader professional development; the design and implementation of mathematics curriculum and assessment; the improvement of instructional practice; and data analysis, strategic planning and school improvement.

For the Public Education Forum, Dr. Molina’s topic is entitled “STAAR: A Focus on Academic Readiness – Are We Ready?” STAAR (State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness) is a new, mandated testing program put in place by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) that will soon be administered throughout the state. This testing program takes the place of the TAKS (Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills).

Educators, students, and parents are encouraged to attend this forum, as well as all other members of the community. There will be an opportunity to ask questions at the conclusion of this event. For more information, contact Dr. Leslie Huling by phone – 512.716.4531 – or by email – la03@txstate.edu. You can also find more information on the RRC Events page.

Gearing up for the fall

Leave a comment

By Kristen McLaughlin

College student studying in Park

College student studying in Park (Photo credit: CollegeDegrees360)

Many students probably have mixed emotions about the fall semester starting, but hopefully there is a part of you that is excited to be back on campus. We hope you experienced some fun vacations, enjoyed your nights off, and spent quality time with loved ones.  As someone who just graduated from a Texas State University master’s degree program in May, I know that each semester comes along with a healthy amount of preparation.  With only a few weeks left before it is back to the daily grind of balancing school with work or other daily tasks, don’t forget to:

  • Enjoy. Do something fun during the short time you have left before school starts again. Go swimming, take a mini vacation, bake cookies, see a movie or read a good book.  Enjoy the free time you have before you get into the school routine.
  • Prepare. Research the text books and supplies you will need for your courses and purchase them in time for classes. Several professors begin assignments right away. Research your professors as well and see if they have a website with some information about the course.
  • Rest. Get plenty of rest and be prepared to adjust your schedule once classes start, especially if you are taking night classes.
  • Get organized.  Get binders and notebooks for the appropriate classes. Keep all of your course subjects separate. Organization definitely helps when you are taking college courses! Organization also extends to your computer or laptop. Create a separate folder on your desktop for each course you plan to take.
  • Practice time management.  Without a doubt, schedules quickly fill up at the beginning of the semester. With multiple projects, papers, a social life and possibly work, it is important to set a daily routine. Keep a planner and mark important dates. It is also helpful to set reminders on your computer or phone.
  • Review information. Review paper work, such as loans and degree programs, especially if this is your first semester. Ask if you have questions.
  • Talk to your advisor. Make sure you are on track with your program. Get in touch with your advisor prior to the semester if you have not already to review your semester plan and overall degree plan.
  • Watch your finances. Be prepared for additional costs such as tuition, books, supplies and school-related events. If you can cut back on eating out or something extracurricular the few weeks before school, it could be beneficial. Every little bit helps!

Important dates before the semester:

  • First day of class: Aug. 27
  • Schedule changes:  Aug. 27-Aug. 30
  • Payment deadline Aug. 23 at 6 p.m. For more information and to pay, click here.

Some helpful websites:

With preparation and a positive attitude, you could start the semester stress free! Best of luck as you start a new semester at Texas State.

Why Texas State University Round Rock Campus?

Leave a comment

By Kristen McLaughlin 

What can you expect at Texas State University Round Rock Campus (RRC)?  To start, friendly faces, a beautiful facility and a top notch education is what I have experienced here.

Having graduated from the Mass Communication graduate school program at Texas State University in May, I had the opportunity to take three classes at the Texas State RRC. This was certainly helpful, since I live in Georgetown. I looked forward to these classes because it saved me gas mileage, but I learned quickly there were many other advantages to taking classes at the Round Rock Campus.

The classes I took here were Creativity in Business, Social Media at Work and International   PR/Advertising. The professors who taught my classes were all seasoned and dynamic. They not only taught the concept, but made it practical and shared their own experiences working in their field. The classes were small and the teachers all encouraged participation. My International PR professor shared his experiences teaching in South Korea, North Korea and other countries. My business professor was able to speak about various companies he worked for and my Social Media professor showed how social media outlets could be helpful for both career and everyday life.

You will probably notice driving onto the small campus on 1555 University Blvd. in Round Rock that it is a small campus with plenty of vacant parking spots. The university consists of two buildings: the St. David’s School of Nursing and Avery (which houses all of the other programs).  Texas State University Round Rock Campus is a satellite campus for Texas State University, but it offers primarily upper-level courses and masters-level programs. If you are thinking about transferring to the Round Rock Campus, view our transfer planning guides here. The campus offers Bachelor’s degrees, Master’s degrees, certification and distance learning ranging in subjects that include Criminal Justice, Education, Nursing, Business and more.  Click here to view a full list of the programs the campus offers.

One aspect I have enjoyed about the Round Rock Campus both as a student and working as a Graduate Research Assistant in the spring is the calm, beautiful atmosphere. Both the inside and the outside of the campus are pristine and peaceful. The campus features a pond and walking trail behind the Avery building. The campus is also environmentally conscious, featuring recycling bins in the student lounge area.

Although it is small, there are definitely resources available that can help students succeed. A Writing Center can be found in Avery 203. Library Services is located in Avery 255 and the comprehensive resources of the Alkek Library can be accessed here.  Are you a student who wants to get more involved in “campus life”? The Round Rock Campus offers plenty of events throughout the year, including the summer. Click here for a listing of events.  And to stay connected to campus, join our social media sites (Facebook and Twitter).

Thinking about attending Texas State RRC? Visit the website for more information. Already a student? What is your favorite aspect of the campus? E-mail km1745@txstate.edu and I will share your answer on our social media sites.

Texas State RRC celebrates graduates

Leave a comment

By Kristen McLaughlin

graduation reception photo

Group photo at the 2011 Texas State RRC Graduation Reception

It is the time of year that can be both stressful and exciting for college seniors and final semester graduate students. The spring graduation is Thursday- Saturday for all graduating Bobcats. For the Texas State University RRC students who are graduating, services and events are available to help students celebrate and alleviate stress during this time.

Texas State University Round Rock Campus spring graduates and students who graduated in the summer or fall of 2011 are welcome to a graduation reception tomorrow from 6-7:30 p.m. in the Avery Building. Students must register. Attendees can bring a maximum of four guests. The event is free, but you must register with your Student ID to attend.  Group photographs of the graduates will be taken, but family and friends are also encouraged to bring their own cameras to take photos. The purpose of the reception is for the Round Rock campus faculty, administration and staff to celebrate the accomplishments of the graduating students who attended classes at the Round Rock location.

For busy students who need a quiet place to study, the student lounge in Avery 202 is open and there are plenty of computer labs and seating areas and study rooms throughout the Avery Building available.

Graduates may also have financial concerns and need help finding a job. There are also resources available at Texas State that can assist with this situation.  As far as a job search goes, the Texas State Career Services in San Marcos offers a variety of services to assist students and alumni. For those who are interested in entrepreneurship, there is also the Small Business Development Center located in Avery 265. There are also two other locations, one in Austin and one in San Marcos. The center offers training and advice for those who are interested in starting a small business.

Although there is so much to think about during this time, graduation is a time filled with opportunities and excitement.  Commencement will be held May 10-12 at Texas State University-San Marcos at the Strahan Coliseum, 700 Aquarena Springs Drive, San Marcos. For more information about parking and seating, click here. I look forward to seeing everyone as we celebrate the accomplishments of Texas State graduates!

The Abacus, the Overhead Projector, and Classroom Technology

Leave a comment

By Jael Perales

Classroom Technology at RRCThe Round Rock Campus is set to host the Technology for Today’s Classroom workshop on Saturday, April 28. This full-day workshop will address topics related to technology and education, and that got me thinking about my own experiences with technology as a student.

My first calculator (well, besides my own brain) was the easiest thing I could get my hands on; namely, my fingers and toes. As you would expect, the math eventually became harder than what my 10 digits could manage, so the next tool provided to me was a basic calculator. You know the type, perfect for doing all kinds of adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing, and apparently something to do with %. But this too was insufficient to tackle the math problems of middle school. Once algebra came into my life, the ol’ number cruncher had seen better days. So, once again, I upgraded, and this time perhaps more than I needed to. You see, I began competing in calculator-based academic competitions, so the tool provided to me was the kind that could handle problems beyond my grade level. I was solving equations, converting units, tackling trigonometry…and I hadn’t even met those issues in my own mathematics classes! And yet, even then, I was limited in what I could do. To advance further as a mathematics competitor and eager, young scholar, I needed something that could handle bigger equations, more complex situations, matrices, and, eventually, graphs. Thus came the powerful graphing calculator and, so it seemed, near limitless capabilities.

But, as luck would have it, I went on to college and was presented with a whole new array of problems. Real-world physics problems to be more precise. And I must say, even the powerhouse that was my graphing calculator was unable to stand up to the challenge. At this point, the only other powerful computational engine available that wasn’t the human brain was, you guessed it, the personal computer. I was introduced to a computer program that could handle giant, complex, mountains of math as easily as I can click the mouse attached to the computer I am writing with now. Suddenly, I looked at newer, more ambitious mathematical projects with a sense of boldness I had never known before.

It is only now that I see the neck-and-neck race that had been occurring in my academic experiences. The technology I used in math seemed to be the deciding factor in what level of math I could study. Or was it that the level of the math determined the tools that were required? It is no secret that technology and education go hand in hand. What one can teach is often directly related to what one can use to teach and learn. When the abacus was the primary tool for doing math, what a student was expected to learn and do was miles behind what most elementary students can handle today. The educator was limited in what he or she could teach. But, as we have all seen, when the technology available to both students and educators advanced, so too did the level of information being taught. In other words, I can teach a 3rd grader how to handle multiplication problems with a calculator that the student may have never been able to accomplish with just an abacus.

Classroom equipment has also experienced significant upgrades. I remember my teachers working out math problems on an overhead projector and showing slightly dated science videos on VHS. Now, teachers can display a computer desktop on a hardwired screen and use their hands or other devices to draw students in with high-tech visuals and up-to-date streaming videos. Advances such as this allows teachers to draw on a wealth of knowledge and visual aids like never before, which not only improves the way they can teach and keep students engaged, but also allows them to teach content that would otherwise have been too high-level.

And you, ever plugged-in college student, how much more useful to you is an educational environment that synchs up with the technology you are accustomed to already? Class projects posted on a social media platform, textbooks on e-readers, and class participation using smartphones. These are just some of the many ways educators can interact with students in and out of the classroom. And “out of the classroom” learning is key in expanding what educators can teach and students can learn. In reality, technology is even expanding the classroom itself.

For educators, the first response to this reality is pretty straightforward. With all the technology out there, where does a teacher or professor even begin? A good place to start is at the upcoming Technology for Today’s Classroom workshop. The event, sponsored by Kappa Delta Pi, Dell, and ePals, is a full-day technology workshop with hands-on exploration and sessions that address 21st Century Learning.  The current list of speakers includes teachers from AISD, PISD, RRISD, DELL, and ePals, with more to come. The event will be held on Saturday, April 28, 2012 from 8:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. at Texas State University Round Rock Campus. Registration is free for all Texas State Education majors, but space is limited. Go to http://www.planetreg.com/E4414551083153 to register. The registration deadline is April 22, 2012 at 10:00 p.m. I encourage you to take advantage of this great opportunity. Expanding what educators can do in the classroom is the key to expanding the capabilities of students. I personally can’t wait to see the abacus of tomorrow!

Rome in 6 days or less

Leave a comment

Article and photos by Dr. Edna Rehbein, Ph.D., Texas State RRC Director

Dr. Rehbein's niece, Vickie, at John Cabot University

Dr. Rehbein's niece, Vickie, at John Cabot University

Over Spring Break, I traveled to Rome to visit my niece who is studying there at John Cabot University. JCU is a liberal arts university in Rome with students from various countries. My niece, Vickie, is perfecting her Italian and studying Communications there and has had an incredible semester.   The weather was perfect – a brisk 50 degrees most of the time. I made a point of actually sitting and observing the crowds, the local artists and musicians, and the incredible fountains and artwork that are found in every direction throughout the city.  Piazza Navona is my favorite.  It has three incredible fountains.

You cannot help but wonder what life must have been like there in the 1500 and 1600s when the majority of the statues and artwork were created.  The statues, fountains, and churches are massive and ornate with incredible attention to every tiny detail carved into the marble.

Bernini's St. Teresa in Ecstacy

Bernini's St. Teresa in Ecstacy

My favorite statue is Bernini’s St. Teresa in Ecstasy.  If you have seen the movie, “Angels and Demons”, you will recognize the statue from the movie.

Umbrella Trees in Rome

Umbrella Trees in Rome

And just when you finally come to grasps with the contributions and history of that period, it hits you that Rome’s history actually goes back many more centuries  and that the Roman Forum and the Coliseum represent another highly advanced era that dates back even earlier in time.  There are some gorgeous trees called the “umbrella pines” that grow on the Palatine Hill. They look like they have been pruned so they only have branches at the top, but that is actually how they grow and they tower over all the ruins.

I was especially fortunate to be in Rome at a time when 100 documents from the Pope’s Secret Archives are on exhibit in the Lux in Arcana Exhibit at the Capitolini Museum.  The exhibit includes documents from kings, czars, sultans, and other world leaders from several centuries.  Included are, the original depositions of over 200 Knights Templar in the 1200s; King Henry VIII of England’s letter requesting the Pope to grant him a divorce;  Martin Luther’s excommunication document; letters from Galileo, Bonaparte, St. Bernadette, St. Theresa, and even the Pope’s appeal for the release of prisoners from the concentration camps of WWII.  This exhibit was truly incredible.  It will be on display through September of this year.  No photographs allowed indoors, of course.

St. Peter's Square after mass

St. Peter's Square after mass

Going to Mass at St. Peter’s Basilica, hearing the Pope bless the masses in various languages, watching the fervor of the crowds in St. Peter’s Square, seeing the massive Castel Sant’Angelo, and celebrating the “festa della donna” – International Women’s Day – a day when all women are treated special – were all pretty nice as well.   But while these sites were incredible, you cannot visit Rome without enjoying its culinary delights and the warm hospitality.  We had gracious service wherever we went. The food and gelato were awesome.

gelato

gelato

Older Entries